Movie: Chachi 420 (1997)
Music Director: Vishal Bhardwaj
Singer: Rekha Bhardwaj

This is one of the early compositions of Vishal Bhardwaj when he was not a big name as he is today. It is sung by his wife Rekha Bhardwaj in her pre genda-phool days. It is from Chachi 420 which was heavily inspired by Mrs.Doubtfire, but was a well made movie in its own right, thanks to sparkling dialogs by Gulzar and crackling performances by the overall cast,  specially the supporting cast of Amrish Puri, Om Puri and Paresh Rawal.

The song is about the coming of terms with separating from the one you loved. It is not one of those “judaai” songs which typically drip with emotions of a doomed life without the ex-lover. This triveni style poem is about accepting that he/she is no longer around and one’s got to move on. Rarely has this part of the break-up been dealt with, in a Hindi film song.

Ek Woh Din Bhi The..Ek Yeh Din Bhi Hain..
Ek Woh Rat Thi..Ek Yeh Raat Hain…

Raat Yeh Bhi Guzar Jayegi, Raat Yeh Bhi Guzar Jayegi!!!!

Koi aata hai palko pe chalta hua
Ek aansoo sunhari sa jalta hua
Khwab bhuj jayenge, raakh reh jayegi
Raat yeh bhi guzar jayegi, Raat yeh bhi guzar jayegi

Waqt saalon ki dhund se nikal jayega
Tera chehraa nazar se pighal jayega
Aankh band hogi toh,neend aajayegi
Raat yeh bhi guzar jayegi, Raat yeh bhi guzar jayegi

EK Woh Din Bhi The..Ek Yeh Din Bhi Hain..
Ek Woh Raat Thi..Ek Yeh Raat Hain…

Raat Yeh Bhi Guzar Jayegi, Raat Yeh Bhi Guzar Jayegi!!!!

My favorite triveni in this lazy composition which is sung with equal amounts of melancholy and hope by Rekha are:

Waqt saalon ki dhund se nikal jayega
Tera chehra nazar se pighal jayega
Aankh band hogi toh, neend aajayegi

Literal translation:
“time will emerge from the mist of years..
your face will melt away from my memory..
if I close my eyes (long enough), sleep will come”

Yes, the translation butchers it all. To those who are used to the word play by Gulzar will get the untamed beauty of the lines above. This is the complete antithesis of the usual “tere bin din soone, tere bin hum mar jayenge” type emotions. This instead is about “with time, even you, who was an integral part of me, your memory will fade away and I shall find my peace”.

We all want to think that some things last forever and this notion is rooted deeply in the work of art that surrounds us in the subcontinent – with our stories of eternal loves, relationships – you know, the  janam-janam kaa bandhan and other such paraphernalia. We all live in denial about the fact that “nothing lasts forever”. Not only do we deny this, but once a relationship ends we overtly romanticize it and feel guilty when we move on to other relationships. This little poem, in my opinion, is about knowing that you loved/had something or someone in the past and now that something or someone is no more. And with time we will move on, and it’s completely “OK” to be doing that: “raat yeh bhi guzar jayegi”.

Gulzar’s choice of simple words to express these complex feelings makes this song a treasure.